Author Topic: Teknetics G2 settings for nuggets...  (Read 1660 times)

Tommygun

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Teknetics G2 settings for nuggets...
« on: November 17, 2014, 07:43 AM »
Hi guys
I purchased a Teknetics G2. Can any one tell me what would be the best settings to have the machine on while hunting for nuggets?
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Paul van Heerden

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Re: Teknetics G2 settings for nuggets...
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2014, 08:44 AM »
Hi guys
I purchased a Teknetics G2. Can any one tell me what would be the best settings to have the machine on while hunting for nuggets?

Hi Tommy. Zulu extreme also has the G2. He only got his a few weeks ago, so might not be able to be that helpful when it comes to gold detection
Paul

Demian (Z-X-T)

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Re: Teknetics G2 settings for nuggets...
« Reply #2 on: March 06, 2018, 12:56 PM »
Good afternoon Tommy, sorry about the late reply... This is not my advice, I found it on another forum, but, it's really worked for me...

Here's the deal -- you need to decide if you want to hunt in A.) discriminate mode (a slightly "shallower" mode, but you get digital readout of probable target ID (VDI), and it allows you to set a "tone break point," below which all metal detected will give a low "grunt" and above which you will get a higher, variable-pitch audio tone (called modulated VCO audio), or B.) if you want to hunt in all-metals mode (a deeper-seeking mode, but which does NOT allow you to set a "tone break," thus all metal targets will sound off in that VCO audio; you also don't get digital readout of VDI, but instead your digital readout will be "ground phase" in that mode (but you still have some ID information on that "dial" above the digital number -- a "range" of VDI numbers will show up on that top row of numbers when you find a metal target in the all-metals mode).

Now, once you decide which mode you want to use (I'd suggest the discriminate mode, to begin with), THEN you have decided what knobs will do what -- because that right-hand dial has different jobs in different modes.

So, if you want to start hunting, in discriminate mode, do this:

A: Turn the unit on, using the left knob; run it as far "clockwise" as you can without hearing the unit become "unstable" (lots of false tones). You want it SMOOTH, no tones. If you can run it (the sensitivity) all the way clockwise, up to 100, do so.
B: Run the detector over the ground, and find a "clean" spot with no metal in the ground.
C: Once you have found that clean spot, turn your right-hand knob to the 12:00 position, put your finger on the "GG" button and hold it, and then pump your coil up and down above the ground, from about a foot down to about an inch, and back up again, repeatedly, until the large number in the centre of the screen (your ground phase) becomes stable, and "closely matches" the small number in the lower right corner (the ground phase number that your unit is using as the "ground balance" point). When the "big" number is pretty stable, and roughly matches the small number in the lower right corner, release the GG button. You are now ground balanced.
D: Now, turn that right hand button all the way back counter clockwise until it "clicks." When it clicks, you have exited all-metals mode, and entered disc. mode. THUS, you obviously cannot set a threshold in disc. mode. If you try to, and start to turn that knob clockwise, and un-click it, you have again entered all-metals mode (and thus, you can set a threshold level). Point is, you don't set a threshold in disc. mode on this machine. You just leave the right-hand knob all the way counter-clockwise, "clicked" into disc. mode.
E. Now, with the machine in disc. mode, and sensitivity (the left button) set as high as you can set it while keeping the machine "stable" with no EMI apparent (which would be "chatter" sounding on the machine), you can now use your arrow keys to set your disc. level. To begin with, I'd run your disc. level up to 40. On the "dial," you will see that once you do this, there will be "black marks" above 40, and "grey marks" from 40 down to zero. The "grey" zone (below 40 in this case) is the range of VDI numbers which will sound off in that low grunting that I mentioned; the "black" zone (above 40 in this case) is the range of VDI numbers that will give you that modulated VCO audio tone. If you decide to set your "tone break" ABOVE 40, you will see a "white" zone begin to appear. For targets that ID in THIS zone, you would hear NO sound. The white zone, if any, is always NO sound; the grey zone is always the low grunt sound, and the black zone is always that modulated VCO audio sound. It is adjustable to your liking. Setting it at 40 is a good place to start.

Now, with the machine set up in this way, iron targets (most of which read 40 or below on this machine -- the smaller the number, in most cases, the smaller the iron piece) will all "grunt" with the low tones; meanwhile, non-iron targets will sound off in the variable VCO audio tones. The digital VDI number will tell you what the machine thinks is under your coil. Numbers in the 40s are usually small pieces of aluminium or foil (and ladies gold rings, many gold bracelets, etc.); numbers in the 50s are often pull tabs, but also nickels and many types of gold jewellery; numbers in the 60s are often junk metal or gold rings; numbers in the 70s will be trash, some large gold rings, and zinc pennies; numbers in the 80s are where most coins will fall, along with a good bit of the silver jewellery; some coins may hit in the low 90s, along with large silver; higher in the 90s is usually rusty iron trash.

Using pinpoint is easy; when you locate a target, move to the side of the target, and press the "GG/Pin Point" button and hold it (make sure you are NOT on top of the target when you press the button), and then run the coil back over the target. Mark the spot on the ground with your eyes where the tone is "loudest;" then, keeping your eye on that spot, turn your body, and the coil, 90 degrees, and run back and forth again across your initial spot. The place where the tone is highest is the spot where the target is (you made an "x" with your coil; the target is at the centre of the "x" where the lines cross).

That's all there is to it. You are now ready to find stuff!! The only other thing is, you may want to repeat the "ground balance" procedure above periodically, as ground conditions will change as you move to different spots.

Hope this helps. You are now set up in a good beginner's mode...happy hunting!

Demian (Z-X-T)

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Re: Teknetics G2 settings for nuggets...
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2018, 12:58 PM »
...and in case you are considering All Metal(s) mode...

I will tell you up front that I don't use all-metals mode too much for most of the types of hunting that I do; having said that, here's what I can tell you about threshold...

Think of threshold as "squelch" on an old CB radio or walkie talkie. There is a certain amount of "background noise" ever present. The "squelch" would silence that background noise, but still allow the "good" transmissions (spoken words) to come through audibly.

Threshold is similar. It can be used to "squelch" the background electromagnetic chatter your machine receives, and yet still allow NON-background signals (i.e. your desired metal targets) to be heard audibly through the speaker/headphones. From this perspective, you would want to slowly turn up the threshold until you get a just barely audible tone (which is the background "noise.") If you set it TOO low, what you are doing is "limiting" or "squelching" the signal to the point that not only will the background electromagnetic chatter be inaudible, but small, deep, "whispering" targets might also be rendered inaudible. On the other hand, if you set the threshold TOO high, such that the "background" noise is TOO loud, those quiet "whispering" sounds from deep targets can be "overwhelmed" by the amplified background chatter -- again, causing you to miss the target. The point is, you want a quiet, but NOT inaudible, threshold. The threshold tone you hear is not going to be totally stable, especially in populated areas where electromagnetic background radiation abounds -- as the background electromagnetic radiation will cause variations in the threshold pitch and volume. But, the bottom line is, if you set it to as close to a "barely audible" level as you can, then any repeatable "variation" or "increase" in the tone, which is being heard "above," or "through," your threshold setting, could be a deep, and/or small, metal target. Obviously, for a larger or shallower target, it won't matter near as much, as that type of signal will overwhelm the threshold and will be heard clearly -- even if your threshold was set a bit too high or a bit too low. Trying to get such a precise threshold is most important if you are really wanting to hear the very small and/or very deep targets (such as would be the case in a gold prospecting application). For normal coin shooting or jewellery hunting, or even relic hunting, it's not quite as important to set your threshold perfectly. Just set it as close as you can to being a "low, quiet hum" and go from there.

I will also say that if your threshold is TOO jumpy/unstable (i.e. not "smooth" enough for you), you can also adjust your sensitivity downward a bit -- so that the machine will be "less sensitive" to very, very small amounts of (background) electromagnetic radiation. If you run your sensitivity from 100 down to, say, 80, you may find that your threshold tone is much more stable/much less "variable" in pitch and volume. NOW, you can adjust your threshold, again -- to where it is barely audible, but with the lower sensitivity setting, the threshold tone may prove to be a more "stable" or "non-varying" tone than it was with sensitivity set higher. My point is you can find some balance in there between sensitivity and threshold that will give you a threshold tone/hum that you prefer. Just remember -- adjusting sensitivity downward will obviously make your detector "less sensitive" to NOT ONLY weak background electromagnetic radiation, but also to the "weak" electromagnetic radiation returning to your coil produced by a small and/or deep metal target in the ground. You can run sensitivity fairly low, and a coin-sized object will still give you a good signal, even if located relatively deep. But you will begin losing "sensitivity" to small/deep/weak targets, obviously, as you lower sensitivity. This is all part of knowing your machine, knowing what you are hunting for, and maximizing the tuning of your machine for your particular style and preferences. This is a more advanced thing -- which takes more experience. For now, as a new user, if you are wanting to hunt in all-metals mode (which I will note is a bit more difficult for a beginner than disc. mode), then I'd say just find that level (using the threshold dial) where your threshold tone is barely audible, and go with it. It will serve you well, done in that way.

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Re: Teknetics G2 settings for nuggets...
« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2018, 12:58 PM »